In the banquet scene in Macbeth, what complaint does Macbeth make about murdered men? Is there anything humorous or ridiculous in the complaint? Act 3 Does Shakespeare use humor for comic relief in...

In the banquet scene in Macbeth, what complaint does Macbeth make about murdered men? Is there anything humorous or ridiculous in the complaint?

Act 3 Does Shakespeare use humor for comic relief in this scene?

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pmiranda2857 eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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In a way it is humorous, but in a black humor kind of way. He is thinking, oh why can't everyone just go away and leave me alone, why can't I get rid of my problems, even when they are killed they don't go away.

Macbeth has become a helpless victim of his treachery and is now descending into madness right in front of everyone.  This is evident even before the murder of Duncan, when he is stricken with conscience before the murder and then unable to sleep, eat or feel normal once he is crowned king.

Once Macbeth has Banquo killed, and then sees his ghost, he is reacting to, not only the murder of his friend, but the shock he feels at being unable to put to rest the feeling...

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Rebecca Owens eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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wallinger | Student

Here Shakespeare trrying to mean the murders that had taken place even before the Ten Commandment was given. That is, before God gave the Ten Commandment  to the Israelites through Moses in the Mt. of Sinai Moses where it says, "thou shalt not kill", Moses had killed an Egyptian and Cain had killed his own brother Abel.

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