A ball rolls on a flat table and then falls to the floor. What are the action-reaction forces?  The other piece of the questions is: (a)    While it is rolling on the table? (b)   As it is...

  1. A ball rolls on a flat table and then falls to the floor. What are the action-reaction forces? 

The other piece of the questions is:

(a)    While it is rolling on the table?

(b)   As it is falling to the floor?

(c)    After it has come to rest on the floor?

 

Could this please be explained in detail such as for me to understand what is being done. I really need to understand physics. Thanks for taking the time to read and answer my question. Have a NICE day.

Asked on by morrisra

1 Answer | Add Yours

bandmanjoe's profile pic

bandmanjoe | Middle School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

This question concerns Sir Isaac Newtons 3rd law of motion, which says "For every action force, there is an equal and opposite reaction force".  So, for starters, there had to be a force applied to the marble, to get it rolling.  Lets say you thumped it with your finger.  The action force was your finger, the reaction force would be the marble rolling across the table.  While it is rolling across the table, the marble, which has mass, is exerting a downward force on the table that we commonly call weight.  That would be the action force.  The table is pushing up on the marble, which would be the reaction force.  Eventually, the marble runs out of table, continues to be pulled by the force of gravity, which is the action force.  So it starts accelerating down towards the floor, which would be the reaction force.  It falls faster with every passing second, which will cause it to hit the floor with an action force.  The floor, being very solid, pushes back with an equal, yet opposite reaction force.  Most of the force will be spent on the downward collision with the floor,but some will probably cause the marble to roll a little way across the floor.  That again would be action force by the collision, and reaction force by the marble moving across the floor.

Hope all this helps!  You have a nice day as well!

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