audio bookI am thinking about teaching The Kite Runner as an audio book with my senior AP English class. Any ideas on how to structure this? My first inclination is to listen for approximately 20...

audio book

I am thinking about teaching The Kite Runner as an audio book with my senior AP English class. Any ideas on how to structure this? My first inclination is to listen for approximately 20 minutes a day, then spend about 15 minutes in a class discussion and another 15 on a short writing assignment (possibly a journal entry), with emphasis on something from that day's excerpt.

Asked on by leagye

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accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I am wondering whether instead of just playing the next section of the audiobook you would benefit from giving the students some kind of "hook" to structure there thinking around what is going to happen. Obviously you don't need to tell them what is going to happen, but I always find whenever I study literature with my students if I can give them some kind of starter question related to what they are going to read or listen to, it enables them to focus and concentrate more. Just an idea.

linda-allen's profile pic

linda-allen | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

Posted on

When I use an audio book, I make sure the students have something in front of them to keep them focused. I have them do a doodle journal, in which they draw, or doodle, images or impressions of what they are listening to. They can also jot down words or phrases to help them remember the story.

I also prepare a study guide, either by downloading one from eNotes or by creating my own, that they can work on while listening.

I've had two big problems with audio books: keeping the kids' attention and getting them to retain what they've listened to. The doodle journal and study guides help.

amy-lepore's profile pic

amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Will you also have hard copies?  It may be difficult for some to catch the words, and little idiocyncracies of the literature (punctuation, spacing, spelling) without also being able to see it.  So much of AP is about examining the language and how the author got that tone, etc. 

Also, it will make a difference who reads the text.  You will want to see if several versions are available to you...someone who does not have a pleasant reading voice or who doesn't read well will cause problems.

Otherwise, it sounds like you've got a great idea.  Good Luck, and let us know how it works!

helenez's profile pic

helenez | College Teacher | eNotes Newbie

Posted on

I am thinking of showing the movie after discussing the book in my college literature course.  Has anyone tried this yet?

 

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