Does Atticus Finch manage his role as a single parent well? 

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As a single father, Atticus may not raise his children to meet the expectations of some people. For example, Aunt Alexandra feels that Scout needs more "feminine influence," and that Atticus is too easy on Scout. Uncle Jack points out that Atticus has "never laid a hand" on Scout after...

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As a single father, Atticus may not raise his children to meet the expectations of some people. For example, Aunt Alexandra feels that Scout needs more "feminine influence," and that Atticus is too easy on Scout. Uncle Jack points out that Atticus has "never laid a hand" on Scout after Uncle Jack punishes her for hitting Francis. However, Atticus models for his children qualities such as kindness, respect, tolerance, and understanding.

Atticus models kindness and respect when he overlooks comments made by Mrs. Dubose. Although she makes hateful remarks, he wishes her well and even uses her as an example of courage when she breaks her addiction to morphine. He models tolerance and understanding when he allows Mr. Cunningham to pay for services using unconventional means and when he does his best to defend Tom Robinson.

There is evidence that Scout and Jem listen to and learn from their father. For example, Jem is devastated when Tom is found guilty. This shows that he takes after his father's example of being fair and kind regardless of the color of a person's skin. In Scout's case, she learns manners and empathy—as demonstrated by her treatment of Boo Radley at the end of the story.

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Yes. In my opinion, Atticus manages his role as a single parent well throughout the novel. He shows his children attention and is continually teaching them important life lessons. Atticus takes time out of his busy schedule to play catch with Jem and to sit on the porch to read with Scout. Whenever his children ask him a question, Atticus answers it as honestly as he can and does not lie to Jem and Scout. Jem and Scout also enjoy their childhood and Atticus allows them to be individuals. He does not raise Scout to be a conventional Southern Belle and allows her to run around in overalls. He also protects his children by acting tolerant towards the racist community members of Maycomb and teaches his children to respect others regardless of their beliefs. He makes the intelligent decision to employ Calpurnia and even invites his sister, Aunt Alexandra, to come live with them so that she can teach Scout how to be a lady. By the end of the novel, Scout and Jem are tolerant, empathetic, moral individuals which reflects on Atticus' parenting skills.

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