Atticus always says that you can't really understand a person until you walk around in their shoes.  What are examples of characters doing this in To Kill a Mockingbird?So far I have when Scout...

Atticus always says that you can't really understand a person until you walk around in their shoes.  What are examples of characters doing this in To Kill a Mockingbird?

So far I have when Scout tried to understand why Dolphus Raymond acted like a drunk, when in reality he just drank Coke; and at the end of the book when Scout walked Boo Radley home and saw through his point of view while standing on the porch.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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Jem.  During his discussion with Scout concerning their conflicting ideas about the "folks" of Maycomb, Jem steps into Boo Radley's skin in order to understand why he prefers the life of a recluse.

"I think I'm beginning to understand why Boo Radley's stayed shut up in the house all this time... it's because he wants to stay inside." (Chapter 23)

Atticus directs Jem to "stand in Bob Ewell's shoes a minute" following the trial in order for his son to understand the motivation for Bob spitting in his face. When Atticus asked if Jem understood, "Jem nodded."

Scout.  Scout steps into Sheriff Tate's shoes after the attack by Bob Ewell in order to understand his decision to falsely call Bob's death self-inflicted.

"I understand... Mr. Tate was right... 
     "Well, it'd be sort of like shootin' a mockinbird, wouldn't it?"  (Chapter 30)

Previously, Scout had forsaken her tomboyish ways at the missionary circle tea, preferring to emulate the very ladylike Aunt Alexandra. After Atticus breaks the news about Tom's death, Scout admired how her aunt and Miss Maudie returned to the guests as if nothing had happened.

     After all, if Aunty could be a lady at a time like this, so could I.  (Chapter 24)

Of course, Scout's first instance of climbing into another person's skin came when Atticus first explained its importance following her terrible first day of school.

... if Walter and I had put ourselves in her [Miss Caroline's] shoes we'd have seen it was an honest mistake on her part.  (Chapter 3)  

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