Atmosphere Sky appears blue because of reflection of the light (blue wave) from atmosphere,,,,so if the atm. were fully transparent,,,,,our sky would have been pitch dark.....then what would the effect on day and night ????????? Will there be not any day ????????????

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The Moon provides a good example -- with no atmosphere, the night side is well on its way towards absolute zero at -170F ( or -110C) and well above the boiling point of water at 265F (or 130C). The night side sky is pitch dark, as the lack of atmosphere denies any light scattering from the sunlit side. Only the light from the stars overhead are visible. On the sunlit side, the full brunt of the Sun may heat the lunar surface, but with the exception of the Sun, on the sunlit side the sky looks exactly like it does on the night side --- black with the points of light from the stars.

http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/mar97/849679535.As.r.html

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The sky would be dark light the night sky if there were no atmosphere to difract the light. So, the answer is yes.

The idea of Obler's Paradox here is interesting. As I understand it, we do not see the starlight from all the stars in the universe at night as a blanket of light because the stars are too far away and moving away from us faster than the speed of light - or they at one point moved away faster than the speed of light and are now out of "light reach". (I don't know if I've got that completely correct though.)

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There's also the question of the sky being dark at night. Obler's Paradox states that the sky is dark at night, but it should be full of bright stars.  No matter where you look, you should see a star.  Instead, the sky is dark with pricks of stars.  You can read more about this here: http://www.amnh.org/education/resources/rfl/web/essaybooks/cosmic/cs_paradox.html

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