At what point do you feel Elie loses his faith in God in Night? What are some examples?

In Night, Elie describes losing his faith in God on his first night in Auschwitz. However, the idea of God has been so important to him for so long that he returns to it several times, but always with doubt and anger and never with faith.

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It must be noted that Elie is not necessarily losing faith in the idea of the existence of God, though there are elements of this in his religious disenchantment. He is not so much becoming an atheist or even an agnostic—rather, he is losing faith in the idea that God...

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It must be noted that Elie is not necessarily losing faith in the idea of the existence of God, though there are elements of this in his religious disenchantment. He is not so much becoming an atheist or even an agnostic—rather, he is losing faith in the idea that God is good and just. As a child, Elie was very religious; that God was good he never doubted. However, once he is forced to bear witness to the horrors of the Nazi concentration camps, Elie finds it harder to believe that God cares about humanity.

The first strike against Elie's faith takes place the first night at Auschwitz. Elie sees children being thrown into fiery ditches to die in agony, and this hellish image returns to him over and over. He holds God accountable for permitting such murders to occur. When he hears other inmates saying Kaddish, a prayer that involves blessing God's name repeatedly, he can only summon anger in response, feeling that God does not deserve the praise. When the others pray, Elie can only think,

As for me, I had ceased to pray. I concurred with Job! I was not denying His existence, but I doubted His absolute justice.

The hanging of the pipel also accelerates Elie's loss of faith. Having been found involved in a planned revolt, the pipel is condemned to death. Both the pipel's youth and his angelic looks contribute to a sense of innocence. While he is slowly strangled to death on the gallows, several onlookers cry out, "Where is God?" Elie says to himself that God is on the gallows—that is, God is dead. For the rest of the novel, Elie experiences a spiritual wasteland, unable to give up a belief in God but unwilling to believe that God cares about humanity at all.

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In Night, Eliezer loses what had been a profound faith in God quite suddenly on his first night at Auschwitz. There are times later in the narrative when he returns to the idea of a God-centered universe through force of habit, but he never recovers from the initial shock of this experience. He hears the Kaddish, the prayer for the dead, and reflects that this may never have been said by people for themselves in the whole of Jewish history.

Remembering the burning bodies on that first night, Eliezer says:

Never shall I forget those flames that consumed my faith forever...

Never shall I forget those moments that murdered my God...

Eliezer learns to survive physically in the concentration camps. What cannot survive, even for a single night, is his conception of a just and loving God. God cannot survive the camps because Eliezer cannot understand how any God worthy of worship could possibly allow such atrocities to occur. This is why he returns to the idea of God after losing his faith on that first night. For years, God has been central to the way in which he understood justice. Now, however, he is always full of doubt and anger when he thinks about God, and he no longer has any faith.

Later, Eliezer compares himself to Job, primarily doubting not the existence of God, but whether he is just. After this, he is angry whenever he hears others praising God:

Thousands of lips repeated the benediction, bent over like trees in a storm. Blessed be God's name? Why, but why would I bless Him? Every fiber in me rebelled. Because He caused thousands of children to burn in His mass graves? Because He kept six crematoria working day and night, including Sabbath and the Holy Days? Because in His great might, He had created Auschwitz, Birkenau, Buna, and so many other factories of death?

Eliezer continues to be furious with his residual idea of a God, even after he has declared that God is dead.

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Elie really begins questioning his faith in God after he witnesses the hanging of the pipel and is forced to stare the corpse of the young boy in the face before he is allowed to eat his dinner. It is the end of the Jewish year and Elie wonders why they are even bothering to show worship and praise to a god that would allow these things to happen to people who had such strong faith in Him. Elie thinks one night on the even of Rosh Hashanah,

"What are You, my God? I thought angrily. . . What does Your grandeur mean, Master of the Universe, in the face of all this cowardice, this decay, and this misery?"

Elie is angry with God and he reminisces on how he used to be so religious and how now he feels that his faith no longer has a purpose and so he denies God,

"I was the accuser, God the accused. My eyes had opened and I was alone, terribly alone in a world without God,"

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