At the time Christy was born, families often sent their disabled children to live in care homes or kept them shut away in a back room. Why did Mrs. and Mr. Brown make Christy an active part of their family in My Left Foot?

Mrs. and Mr. Brown chose to make Christy an active part of their family in My Left Foot because Christy's mother, Bridget, disagreed with the doctors' beliefs that her son was mentally and intellectually impaired. She cared for and taught her son, while also raising her other twelve children. With her help and support, Christy was able to accomplish great things.

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In his autobiography, My Left Foot, Christy Brown details the struggles he faced living with cerebral palsy as well as the extraordinary accomplishments he achieved despite his diagnosis.

When Christy was only four months old, his mother, Bridget, noticed that he was not like other babies his age. He...

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In his autobiography, My Left Foot, Christy Brown details the struggles he faced living with cerebral palsy as well as the extraordinary accomplishments he achieved despite his diagnosis.

When Christy was only four months old, his mother, Bridget, noticed that he was not like other babies his age. He was unable to control the movements of his body and keep his head held upright.

Christy's parents sought medical attention for him and were devastated to learn that their son had cerebral palsy, an incurable neurological disorder characterized by extreme difficulty with motor functions and muscular coordination. This condition is caused by abnormal brain development or damage to the brain sustained either before or during birth.

Doctors told the Browns that their son's condition was advanced, and, believing Christy to be severely mentally and intellectually impaired, they urged the Browns to institutionalize Christy.

At this time, disabled children were often hidden away or sent to live in institutions or care facilities. Despite their son's discouraging prognosis and the grim advice of his doctors, the Browns chose to keep their son at home and raise him with the rest of his family.

Although the doctors were convinced of Christy's mental and intellectual impairment, Bridget's faith in her son never wavered. Even though there was no denying his physical limitations, Bridget did not agree with the doctors' assessment that her son was mentally or intellectually challenged. She insisted on raising him at home.

It was difficult to obtain educational accommodations for disabled children at the time, so Bridget worked with Christy herself, while also caring for him and raising her other twelve children. With his mother's help and unwavering support, Christy was able to learn how to read, write, and communicate. He discovered that he was able to use and control the toes in his left foot and, amazingly, went on to become a skilled painter and writer.

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