At the end of the story, the narrator, in reference to Jim and Della, says, "Of all who give gifts these two were the wisest." Why does the narrator think that Jim and Della are wise?

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The ending of “The Gift of The Magi” tells of the beautiful sacrifices Jim and Della make for one another. In this famous story, Jim sells his pocket watch to buy Della a set of combs for her hair, while Della cuts and sells her hair to buy Jim a...

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The ending of “The Gift of The Magi” tells of the beautiful sacrifices Jim and Della make for one another. In this famous story, Jim sells his pocket watch to buy Della a set of combs for her hair, while Della cuts and sells her hair to buy Jim a chain for his pocket watch. In the end, they each sacrifice something precious to themselves because the other person’s joy is more important.

The writer states that there is no wiser gift-giver than these two, mainly because they know the meaning of the gift and the importance of the recipient. It is clear that the two mean much more to one another than the items they lose, which shows how highly they value each other and how much they want to make each other happy. Additionally, they know that their gifts are truly valuable and important because of the joy they will bring. They are wise because they value their love above all material possessions.

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