At first, what does Juliet believe is the only solution to her problem in act 4?

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In the play "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare, it is interesting to note that ,for Juliet, it is never an option to just go ahead and marry Paris without saying anything. This option would have bought her some time while they all thought about waht...

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In the play "Romeo and Juliet" by William Shakespeare, it is interesting to note that ,for Juliet, it is never an option to just go ahead and marry Paris without saying anything. This option would have bought her some time while they all thought about waht to do to solve the problem. That alternative, to accept the County Paris, is obviously a fate worse than death for Juliet. Romeo would not have been too pleased either. Her actual response is very illuminating for us as readers. Elsewhere in the play she is described as "hot" and "sweet." Here, she is showing her impulsive and passionate side. The irony about the suicide idea is that she fulfils the foreshadowing of death throughout the play by dying anyway.

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In Act IV, Scene 1, Juliet is talking to Friar Lawrence about what she can do.  She does not want to marry Paris, but her parents are insisting on it very strongly.

At that point, she thinks that her best option or only option is to just go ahead and kill herself.  She tells Friar Lawrence that she would rather die (she tells him all sorts of ways she'd rather die) than marry Paris.  For example:

O, bid me leap, rather than marry Paris,
From off the battlements of yonder tower

It is at this point that Friar Lawrence comes up with his idea about having her take that potion.

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Juliet's biggest problem arrives when Romeo is banished for killing her cousin Tybalt, and her marriage to Paris is moved up by her family. Her father has refused to delay the marriage and even threatened to disown her if she refuses to marry Paris. Even the Nurse, her strongest confidant, has counseled that she should wed Paris. Juliet seeks solace from the Friar, and runs into Paris at the church, reinforcing her conflict. Once Paris leaves, Juliet confronts the Friar demanding a solution, and if one is not presented to her, she says she will take her own life that very instant. Suicide seems to be the only answer to her in that moment. It's not until the Friar concocts a complicated plan faking Juliet's death so she can be reunited with Romeo that she abandons the thought of killing herself.

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