If we were back in the 1960s, assuming that discrimintaion against blacks in the workforce could be ended, or at least reduced, what would the long-term implications be for blacks and for society...

If we were back in the 1960s, assuming that discrimintaion against blacks in the workforce could be ended, or at least reduced, what would the long-term implications be for blacks and for society in general?

Asked on by ben235

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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A person in the 1960s who supported the Civil Rights Movement would probably have thought that an end to discrimination would have had more of an impact than it has.

A person at that time would probably have thought that ending discrimination in the workplace would have made African Americans much more equal to whites by now.  They would have thought that blacks would have been able to get equal access to good jobs and that this change would have resulted, generally speaking, in equality between the two races.

The person might also have thought that society would be more colorblind by now.  They would have thought that white people would think more of blacks as equals once the African Americans were allowed to hold jobs that were as good as those that white people had.  The more that actual equality increased, the more white perceptions that blacks were equal would have increased.

This has, to some extent, come true.  However, it has not come true to the extent that might have been expected.  This is largely because discrimination in the workforce was not the biggest obstacle facing African Americans then and it is not the biggest obstacle facing them today.

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