What are some aspects of feminist "voice" in Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte? Feminist analysis on voice.

Expert Answers info

D. Reynolds eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2016

write8,927 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

Jane Eyre herself is an important expression of the feminist voice in the novel, and so is Rochester's wife, Bertha.

From being locked in the Red Room to exiled at the miserable Lowood School, Jane spends much of her life held in place and constrained. When she arrives at Thornfield Hall, she one day gives vent to her feelings, thinking to herself that women should have more freedom:

Women are supposed to be very calm generally: but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and a field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, to absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. It is thoughtless to condemn them, or laugh at them, if they seek to do more or learn more than custom has pronounced necessary for their sex.

Feminists from Virginia Woolf to Gilbert and Gubar in their groundbreaking study The Madwoman in the Attic have noted the anger at women's condition that Jane Eyre expresses. Woolf saw it as a...

(The entire section contains 2 answers and 632 words.)

Unlock This Answer Now


check Approved by eNotes Editorial

tinicraw eNotes educator | Certified Educator

calendarEducator since 2011

write2,317 answers

starTop subjects are Literature, History, and Social Sciences

check Approved by eNotes Editorial