As readers we know the historical outcome of the American revolution, specifically that the patriots eventually win the war and that the harsh conditions of slavery continue. How does our point of view add to the suspense?

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Knowing how the Revolutionary War ended contributes to the reader's suspense because it's difficult to understand how Isabel, who allied with the Rebels, could escape slavery and find happiness in a country that continued the horrible practice of slavery after the war.

Isabel joins with the Rebels because they offer...

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Knowing how the Revolutionary War ended contributes to the reader's suspense because it's difficult to understand how Isabel, who allied with the Rebels, could escape slavery and find happiness in a country that continued the horrible practice of slavery after the war.

Isabel joins with the Rebels because they offer her the chance to escape slavery if she helps them. She lives with a Loyalist couple, and the Patriots know that she can get information about the British plans from them. She agrees to help them in the hopes that she and her sister will escape.

However, readers familiar with the war know that slavery continues in New York after it's all said and done. The suspense isn't so much about who wins the war but rather about how Isabel can escape her bonds. At the end of the book, her fate is still unclear. Though she and Curzon make it to Jersey, their eventual fate is still unknown. At the very least, she's escaped the Locktons.

It's all about telling a small, personal story inside the larger context of a real historical event. Isabel is interesting to the reader not because they know the fate of the world around her but because they don't know her fate. As the reader empathizes with her and grows to care for her, it's important to them that she's able to find a way out of her life of bondage. Whether she works with the British or the Patriots, readers want Isabel to be free.

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