Aristotle considers Sophocles' Oedipus Rex as the perfect example of tragedy.  Explain why. With examples from the play please.

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Another aspect of Aristotle's theory relevant here is the threefold response that an audience must have to an effective, well-written tragedy. First, the audience must develop an emotional attachment to the tragic hero—in this case, Oedipus; second, the audience must fear what will happen to the hero; and third, after misfortune has struck, the audience must feel pity for the hero. Taken together, these three elements can then be applied to Oedipus Rex.

We have an emotional attachment to Oedipus because we recognize him as a noble character, a bigger and better version of ourselves. Because we have an emotional attachment to him we fear for what may befall him. Oedipus's hamartia or fatal flaw is one that is embedded deep within the human soul—a lack of knowledge; in his particular case a lack of knowledge concerning his true identity. Watching the action unfold, we can somewhat imagine ourselves in the same position of Oedipus.

Finally, we feel pity for Oedipus when, tortured by the...

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