I need help finding 3 arguments for my thesis statement on a monologue in Romeo and Juliet. This is my thesis statement:  In this monologue, William Shakespeare shows that Romeo's murdering of...

I need help finding 3 arguments for my thesis statement on a monologue in Romeo and Juliet. This is my thesis statement: 

In this monologue, William Shakespeare shows that Romeo's murdering of Tybalt causes Juliet to question all of her feelings for him, even though she finds him to be a very attractive man. 

 

This is the monologue:

O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
Beautiful tyrant! Fiend angelical!
Dove-feathered raven, wolvish-ravening lamb!
Despisèd substance of divinest show,
Just opposite to what thou justly seem’st.
A damnèd saint, an honorable villain!
O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?
Was ever book containing such vile matter
So fairly bound? Oh, that deceit should dwell
In such a gorgeous palace!
Expert Answers
Chase Burns eNotes educator| Certified Educator
This monologue features an extremely confused and shocked Juliet who feels betrayed by Romeo. She jumps between descriptions of Romeo, trying to land on the best description that articulates the hurt she feels due to Romeo's murdering of Tybalt.

In an effort to be specific, let's find your three arguments within the text of this monologue.

1. Juliet no longer trusts Romeo.

O serpent heart hid with a flowering face!
Did ever dragon keep so fair a cave?
From the beginning of the speech, Juliet proclaims that a darker, dangerous side of Romeo must exist beneath his beautiful exterior. 

2. Juliet considers the possibility that an evil spirit has tricked her into falling in love with Romeo.

O nature, what hadst thou to do in hell
When thou didst bower the spirit of a fiend
In moral paradise of such sweet flesh?

While this feeling does not last, Juliet contemplates if Romeo was sent to deceive her.

3. Juliet is entirely confused. In this speech, Juliet compares Romeo to countless images, including a dragon, lamb and a tyrant. She does not understand how such a vile person could exist underneath a gorgeous surface, and she's trying to make sense of this deception. This confusion is an example of how Juliet is questioning everything she feels for Romeo.

Read the study guide:
Romeo and Juliet

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