The argument for affirmative action is thatA. people who have been discriminated against deserve positions, even if they are not qualified.B. there is no other decisive evidence for proving that...

The argument for affirmative action is that
A. people who have been discriminated against deserve positions, even if they are not qualified.
B. there is no other decisive evidence for proving that discrimination has ended.
C. if businesses and universities do not use it, they will be sued.
D. politicians like it.
E. the public overwhelmingly supports it.

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pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

None of these answers are really good.  However, the best of the answers is Option B.  We can argue that affirmative action is still necessary because we cannot prove that discrimination (whether conscious or otherwise) has stopped hurting African Americans and others.

Option A is not right because affirmative action does not require that a person has been discriminated against. It only requires that a person belong to a group that has been discriminated against.  Also, affirmative action does not require the hiring of a person who is unqualified.

Options D and E are not right.  Affirmative action is not very popular with politicians or with other Americans.  Option C may be one reason why some businesses and universities use it, but it is not a positive argument for affirmative action.

The most common argument for affirmative action is that blacks and others still face more hurdles than whites in attempting to get an education and a good job.  Option B is the closest answer to this.

Sources:

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