From a utilitarian view, argue against executing criminals.

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From a utilitarian point of view, the argument against the death penalty would be that it does not increase the overall happiness of society.  

Of course, the death penalty brings a great deal of unhappiness to the average person who is subjected to it and to his or her...

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From a utilitarian point of view, the argument against the death penalty would be that it does not increase the overall happiness of society.  

Of course, the death penalty brings a great deal of unhappiness to the average person who is subjected to it and to his or her family and friends.  It may also bring unhappiness to those who feel that the death penalty is an immoral thing.  In order to offset this unhappiness, the death penalty would have to increase the happiness of some segment of the population.

If the death penalty does not deter future murderers, it is not likely to raise the happiness of society as a whole enough to overcome the unhappiness it brings.  It will make the family and friends of the victim a bit happier, but it will not bring their loved one back.  

The utilitarian argument for the death penalty rests on it deterring potential criminals from acting.  If it does not deter future criminals, it does not increase happiness enough to offset the intense unhappiness it brings to a few people.

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