Are there significant religious themes in William Shakespeare's Hamlet?

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William Shakespeare'sHamlet does not have many overt religious themes, in the sense of discussions of theology, and critical attention has mainly been focussed on other elements of the play. However, Shakespeare himself and his audience were Christians and Christian morality forms the ground against which the play would...

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William Shakespeare's Hamlet does not have many overt religious themes, in the sense of discussions of theology, and critical attention has mainly been focussed on other elements of the play. However, Shakespeare himself and his audience were Christians and Christian morality forms the ground against which the play would have been interpreted. Thus we can look at Hamlet's ambivalence as one between an older eye-for-an-eye system of morality and the Christian duty of turning the other cheek. Moreover, he is convinced to do the sinful act of murder by a ghost -- and ghosts would be considered evil in Christian thought. This it would be possible to read the play in terms of Christian ethics.

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