Choose at least two of Sir Robert Peel's nine principles and provide specific examples of how they apply to policing today. Be sure to include at least two specific examples for each principle you...

Choose at least two of Sir Robert Peel's nine principles and provide specific examples of how they apply to policing today. Be sure to include at least two specific examples for each principle you describe

I choose the following two:

1.  The absence of crime will best prove the efficiency of police, and

2.  The securing and training of proper persons is at the root of efficiency.

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teachsuccess | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Hello! You asked for specific examples for each principle.

The absence of crime will best prove the efficiency of police.

1) Community policing in New York City effectively reduced crime throughout the 80s and 90s. This effective method of policing has increased the efficiency of the police force in crime prevention. In 2015, take a close-up view of what community policing looks like in New York City. What is community policing? This is basically the act of dividing each precinct into neighborhood sectors and assigning specific officers to these sectors. Police work with social workers, schools, and specific programs to reduce crime. Because the officers assigned to areas will not change, this will allow neighborhoods to develop essential relationships with officers. This is one means of increasing efficiency in crime prevention.

2) The absence of crime derives from police efficiency: read the special issue on how New York City became safe. At the heart of efficiency was the restoration of order as demanded by community organizations in NYC. This was done by first tackling disorder within the city: the homeless were hired to clean the streets; the Metropolitan Transit Authority worked with the NYPD to eradicate graffiti and fare-beating, especially at Penn Station and Grand Central Station; the implementation of Compstat, a tactical planning and police accountability system, was put in place. With accountability comes efficiency.

The securing and training of proper persons is at the root of efficiency.

1) In some cities, police departments are streamlining the application process to attract better candidates. In 2007, 11 Northern Iowa enforcement agencies worked together to make sure that the names of all candidates who passed the mandated state written and physical exams were shared with all area police departments. Area chiefs instituted joint training programs to ensure all police officers receive continued support in maintaining efficiency through mandated training, recertification, and professional development.

2) Read Al-Jazeera's article on how police departments hire the right people for the job.  Questions asked: Can younger police officers perform effectively and maintain impartiality? Also, should police officers have degrees or some college education? How might this affect the hiring of minority police officers? Why is there a lack of minority police applicants which best represent the racial make-up in a community?

For Fred Atkins, who was elected Sarasota, Florida's first African-American mayor, the proper hiring of persons is key. He worked with the Department of Justice in the 80s to reform hiring practices, reasoning that

"The implied message that is perceived is that they are lowering the standards so that the chief can hire more minority officers. And that’s not the reality. Hispanics, women, African-Americans are all graduating from colleges. I believe — and the greater community believes — that educated officers are more likely to be more responsible. You know, it’s not like we want to hire people that are less informed or less educated. African-Americans have always been willing to do what it takes to qualify. We always reach the heights of what is needed.”

I hope this provides a starting point for the examples you are looking for. Thanks for the interesting question!

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