Apart from the people, describe the setting of this future world. How is this world Utopian in nature?

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The word utopia technically speaking is neutral, simply meaning "no place," a nonexistent world usually set in the future, though it has come usually to mean a positive fictitious world in contrast to its opposite, a dystopia (sometimes called an anti-utopia or negative utopia). In reality, futuristic depictions in literature...

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The word utopia technically speaking is neutral, simply meaning "no place," a nonexistent world usually set in the future, though it has come usually to mean a positive fictitious world in contrast to its opposite, a dystopia (sometimes called an anti-utopia or negative utopia). In reality, futuristic depictions in literature often tend to be ambivalent rather than clearly good or evil. We are shown a place that might seem a positive utopia on first glance, but when looked into closely is another thing altogether.

In The Time Machine the society the Time Traveler encounters 800,000+ years in the future is an archetype of such a facade of good that is at first encountered only to reveal later a sinister core. It's not really conceivable to judge this world without reference to its people unless we simply observe the pastoral nature of the landscape. The works of civilization have disappeared. This could be the dream of an environmentalist who wished to de-construct the developed world of our time, or even of the past 5,000 years, and recreate prehistory. With regard to the remnant of humanity he encounters, the Time Traveler's observation is that this is "Communism." Wells's book predates the Soviet Union by twenty years, so we are not talking about a totalitarian state but one in which there is equality and communal living. The Traveler only later discovers that the childlike, seemingly contented Eloi who live on the surface are actually being herded like cattle by the subterranean Morlocks.

A utopia or dystopia in which people don't have to work and are taken care of like children in a peaceful, pastoral milieu has been repeated in science fiction and fantasy many times in the past 120 years. In Wells's portrayal, however, there is actually relatively little ambiguity about this dystopia. It's unlikely that any of us would consider this future as one desirable in any way for mankind, despite its outward tranquility.

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