In Antigone, what is the penalty for breaking the decree set forth by Creon?

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Creon has decreed that Polyneices' body will be left to rot out in the open as he was one of the so-called 'Four against Thebes,' the traitors who led an invasion force against the city and desecrated its temples. Furthermore, the king of Thebes solemnly declares that anyone who attempts...

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Creon has decreed that Polyneices' body will be left to rot out in the open as he was one of the so-called 'Four against Thebes,' the traitors who led an invasion force against the city and desecrated its temples. Furthermore, the king of Thebes solemnly declares that anyone who attempts to bury Polyneices' corpse will be stoned to death. Creon doesn't seriously expect his orders to be disobeyed; this is a man used to getting his own way. In Thebes, his word is law. So when Antigone comes along and brazenly defies his kingly decrees, Creon is quite taken aback.

Though outraged at this open challenge to his authority, he has to tread carefully here. As well as being Polyneices' sister, Antigone is also engaged to be married to Creon's son, Haemon. In Ancient Greek society, killing or harming a relative was strictly taboo and was thought to bring down the wrath of the gods. So instead of having Antigone stoned to death Creon has her walled up in a cave. This way, he won't be harming her directly; she'll simply die of starvation. Creon hopes that by punishing Antigone in this manner he will appease the gods' anger.

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In Sophocles's tragic play Antigone, Creon, the ruler of Thebes, makes a decree that Polyneices's body will be subjected to public shame after the civil war led by the rivaling brothers (Polyneices and Eteocles) ends with both men dead. While Eteocles's body will be properly honored and handled, Polyneices will not receive holy rights and will go unburied so animals can pick at his carcass. 

Creon decides the consequence of breaking this decree is death. Despite this, Antigone risks her life to honor her brother's legacy by giving him a burial.

As a result, Creon has her imprisoned and then buried alive in a cave. These actions displease the gods, and the Chorus tries to warn Creon that Antigone should be freed. Unfortunately, Creon is too stubborn to listen; Antigone kills herself, causing suffering to fall upon the land.

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