Anthropological activities crucial to food production like agriculture and raising animals have significant impact on lakes. Propose a solution to the issue, and describe the effects they will have on the lake ecosystem.

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Many problems related to agriculture, within the larger condition of Nonpoint Source Pollution (NPS), are caused by runoff. One effect is sedimentation, which contributes to reducing the amount of water flowing into lakes via streams and rivers. The ways to reduce sedimentation include changes in farm management practices. Farmers could...

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Many problems related to agriculture, within the larger condition of Nonpoint Source Pollution (NPS), are caused by runoff. One effect is sedimentation, which contributes to reducing the amount of water flowing into lakes via streams and rivers. The ways to reduce sedimentation include changes in farm management practices. Farmers could work on practices such as controlling the runoff water’s volume and rate of flow and keeping soil in place. These will be especially beneficial by reducing changes in the shoreline or littoral zone that is home to numerous plant and animal species, including birds and amphibians.

Another NPS, agricultural runoff-related problem is chemical use, especially when applied as fertilizer, herbicide, or pesticide. The chemicals applied to the land enter streams, rivers, and lakes after it rains or snows. Regarding pesticides, the practice of Integrated Pest Management (IPM), a systematic approach tailored to the soils, climate, and crops, as well as the pests presenting a problem in a specific agricultural field. By encouraging natural barriers, IPM not only reduces pesticide use and related movement from field to water, but supports biodiversity. Reducing the chemical pollution in lakes promotes healthy development of native biota and reduces risks of harm to humans and other animals who consume the plants and animals that grow in and utilize the lakes.

Animal grazing is associated with the production of manure that enters the water. Adjustments to grazing intensity and restricting livestock from sensitive areas are likely to reduce the amount of manure entering the water. In turn, this will help encourage the naturally beneficial vegetation while preventing undesirable plants from growing, promote healthier fish habitat, and protect streambanks and floodplain areas.

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