Answer the five nonfiction questions from the perspective of Dr. King. Pay special attention to the fourth and fifth questions. What does Dr. King want his audience to believe or do, and what...

Answer the five nonfiction questions from the perspective of Dr. King. Pay special attention to the fourth and fifth questions. What does Dr. King want his audience to believe or do, and what arguments and/or persuasive techniques does he employ to persuade them?

Five nonfiction questions in the Perspective of Dr. King:

1. Who am I?

2. What do I value?

3. What do I think is true?

4. What does Dr. King want his audience to believe or do?

5. What arguments and/or persuasive techniques does he employ to persuade them?

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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1. The grandson and son of Baptist ministers, Martin Luther King, Jr. was a minister himself and a civil rights activist who followed the example of Mahatma Ghandi in leading non-violent protests against legal segregation of African-Americans in the South and other parts of the United States. Further, he was responsible for the creation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. King won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

2. King was responsible for the advancement of African-Americans from a marginalized resident of the U.S. to a citizen of the country.

3. King firmly believed that the phrase "all men are created equal" in the Declaration of Independence included African-Americans. 

4. Dr. King wants his audience to believe that the time for the equality of all Americans has come.

And there will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

5. Dr. King appeals to his audience's sense of justice:

We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities.

The hope is that America as "the land of the free" will include all Americans; he hopes that in such states as Mississippi and Alabama that have disenfranchised "Negroes" will one day recognize them as citizens of value.  

Sources:

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