In the book, Animal Farm, why does Old Major think that revolution is possible at Manor Farm?

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In the first chapter of Animal Farm, Old Major gives an inspiring speech to the animals of Manor Farm. Old Major believes that rebellion is imminent and inevitable and he has come to this conclusion for a number of reasons.

First of all, Old Major is coming to the...

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In the first chapter of Animal Farm, Old Major gives an inspiring speech to the animals of Manor Farm. Old Major believes that rebellion is imminent and inevitable and he has come to this conclusion for a number of reasons.

First of all, Old Major is coming to the end of his life and has gleaned some important lessons about the nature of being. This is combined with a strange dream in which he glimpses the future when "Man has vanished." This gives Old Major the sense that Manor Farm is poised on the verge of an important event.

Secondly, Old Major has figured out the exploitative relationship between animals and Man. He understands that men are cruel and selfish and that they are the "only animals who consume without producing." He sees that the suffering of animals is the direct result of this exploitation and that animals can only free themselves if they overthrow men like Mr. Jones.

Finally, the animals' reception to Major's speech convinces him that rebellion is possible at Manor Farm. When he sings the song, The Old Beasts of England, for example, the animals are thrown into the "wildest excitement." They start to sing it for themselves before Major has finished and quickly know most, if not all, of the words. In fact, it is only the interruption of Mr. Jones' gun that stops the animals from singing all night.

Rebellion is now in the hearts and minds of the animals of Manor Farm and it is only a matter of time until it is fully realized. 

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