In Animal Farm, can you please give me some examples of level 3 questions (meaning reading is extratextual) for an inner and outer circle activity.In Animal Farm, can you please give me some...

In Animal Farm, can you please give me some examples of level 3 questions (meaning reading is extratextual) for an inner and outer circle activity.

In Animal Farm, can you please give me some examples of level 3 questions (meaning reading is extratextual) for an inner and outer circle activity.

Asked on by kandacedf1

4 Answers | Add Yours

e-martin's profile pic

e-martin | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Here are a few ideas:

  • How does Animal Farmcompare to 1984? 
  • Create an original definition of a hero. Who is the hero of Animal Farm? Is there a hero?
  • Create an original definition of a villian. Who is the villain in Animal Farm? Is there a villian? 
  • Think of other stories that have a hero but no villain and stories with a villain and no hero. Is it essential for a story to have one or the other or both?
litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Level three questions will focus on higher-order thinking skills.  The best way to write these questions is to focus on judgement and application.  For example:  Do you think Snowball should have intervened to stop Napoleon?  Other questions might include:  Why do you think some humans agree to work with the animals?

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I am afraid I am not entirely sure I completely understand your question. However, what it seems to be referring to are questions that explore the power relationship of the various animals in this great novel and how they are positioned. It is clear that the pigs become the rulers of the farm, with the other animals being reduced into positions of slavery and drudgery as they are forced to do all the work and all the defending of the farm so that the pigs can enjoy all the fruits of their labour. You might find it useful to think about the following questions:

1) Who gives and receives orders on the farm?

2) Who has the most power and how is this power maintained?

3) Who does most of the work on the farm?

4) Who gains most benefit from all the work being done on the farm?

Hopefully, reading the text with these questions in mind will help you identify the various power relationships that occur in the novel and also help you to think through how they are created and sustained. Good luck!

akannan's profile pic

Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

One interesting question is to pose how a modernized version of the farm would look today.  This can take on a couple of forms.  One way is to ask if we have modern counterparts to the animals today.  For example, who is the modern Boxer?  Who would be the modern Squealer?  Who would be the modern Napoleon?  I think that posing these questions would enable a thought to happen beyond the text and consider the ideas of the text to be linked to the outside world.  Another real interesting application question to this would be to apply technology to the farm.  What would happen if Benjamin could text or blog or tweet his recognition of his reading of the truck that comes to take Boxer away?  What would Mollie look like if she had the modern trappings to help enhance her identity and sense of self?  I think that being able to apply the modern setting to the book and its characters could form some very interesting questions.

We’ve answered 318,988 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question