In Animal Farm by George Orwell, what happened to the milk and apples, where did they both go?

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andrewnightingale | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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The first item which disappeared was the milk. Soon after the Rebellion, the cows' udders were filled to bursting point since they had not been milked for some time and when they had finally been relieved of their load, there were five buckets of creamy milk.

But at this moment the three cows, who had seemed uneasy for some time past, set up a loud lowing. They had not been milked for twenty-four hours, and their udders were almost bursting. After a little thought, the pigs sent for buckets and milked the cows fairly successfully, their trotters being well adapted to this task. Soon there were five buckets of frothing creamy milk at which many of the animals looked with considerable interest.

The animals were quite interested in the milk and wondered what was going to be done with it. Snowball told them not to worry about it for it would be taken care of. When they returned from the harvest that evening, they saw that the milk had disappeared.

The mystery was later cleared up when it was discovered that the milk was mixed into the pigs' mash every day.

It was also about this time that the early apples were ripening and there were windfall apples spread all around. The apples were claimed by the pigs and they were taken to the harness room for their exclusive use. The animals had assumed that these would be shared equally amongst them and some of the animals moaned about this. Their complaints went unheard for all the senior pigs were in agreement that the apples should be reserved for their exclusive use.

Snowball was sent around to explain this to the other animals and he cleverly informed them that the pigs needed the animals for brain food so that they could manage the farm properly for, if they did not, Jones would return. Obviously, none of the animals wanted this to happen and all complaints stopped.

These two events clearly indicate how the pigs could (and would) manipulate the other animals with lies and misleading information. Since they were not intelligent enough to challenge these stories, the other animals submitted to the pigs' authority. This gave the pigs the ideal opportunity to create even greater privileges for themselves at the cost of the others - a situation similar to the one these animals (except of course, the pigs) found themselves in before the Rebellion.

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