angerme and my student are looking for good sites. he has a anger issue and we have things like wait he should do to calm down. like pet your pet or take a nice walk. So we are looking for sites...

anger

me and my student are looking for good sites.

he has a anger issue and we have things like wait he should do to calm down.

like pet your pet or take a nice walk.

So we are looking for sites what help has of studies and why they work.

thanks for the help =)

 

Asked on by mr-i-answer

8 Answers | Add Yours

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

There are good resources out there, but you need to refer the student for actual counseling. Anger issues cannot be addressed by reading books. You have to identify and treat the source of the problem. A lot of the solutions will also depend on the student. Some students learn how to cope with life by playing sports, and others through art or music.
besure77's profile pic

besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I work with some students who have these types of issues. I find that the best thing to do is let them calm down before doing anything. It is also best to let them talk about it when they are ready. Rushing them and putting pressure on them only makes things worse and they end up shutting down.

drmonica's profile pic

drmonica | (Level 2) Associate Educator

Posted on

Exercise is an excellent way to dissipate anger and calm down. Some sites you might want to look at include:

Get Your Angries Out! (http://www.angriesout.com/)

http://www.buzzle.com/articles/anger-management-techniques-for-kids-and-teens.html

Good luck with your student! I went through this for years with my own son, who is now a junior in college and has learned several strategies to keep his anger under control.

lynn30k's profile pic

lynn30k | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

Anger is a result of something else going on with this person; it doesn't just exist in a vacuum. Either there is some underlying biochemical cause, or there is some environmental cause. Just treating the anger is only treating one aspect, unless you know why the anger exists. I know what you are saying, though--no matter what the cause, the person needs to find socially acceptable ways to express it. But there are some very good reasons for anger in this world, and you do need to help this person find out why his anger responses are extreme; he may not know that is the case.

booksnmore's profile pic

booksnmore | College Teacher | (Level 3) Adjunct Educator

Posted on

Can someone (perhaps a counselor) help the student to figure out the root cause behind the anger? If it's a chemical imbalance, for example, the solution might be different than if he is having family problems.

I can tell you a couple things I learned from a child psychologist. Joint compression can help to produce seratonin or "happy hormone." The student could jump up and down or push hard against the wall to stimulate joint compression. The student could also do a technique called "steel and spaghetti." He needs to tense every bit of his body up as tight as he can (steel) for several seconds and then completely relax every part of his body, bending forward so that his fingers are dropping toward the ground (spaghetti.)

lrwilliams's profile pic

lrwilliams | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator

Posted on

There are many things to consider with this question. Are you a counselor? If not, then discussing the student's anger issues with a school counselor would probably be the first place to start. S/he is trained to deal with such issues. Many teachers take too much on themselves in an effort to fix situations that are not fixable in the normal classroom setting.

The two big things that you can do is 1)Make sure your standards and expectations are clearly understood by all students. 2)Recognize those things that you can change in yourself to make the situations more stable and consistent for the student.

ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

Father Flanagan’s Boystown has some wonderful resources that can help students and teachers alike. Some of those resources should have information with some of the behavior modification strategies they use. They have step by step instructions for such things as accepting no, following instructions, and etc.

epollock's profile pic

epollock | (Level 3) Valedictorian

Posted on

I would look at sites like http://www.apa.org/topics/anger/control.aspx, it is from the American Psychological Association and the site offers many other useful tips and has numbers and addresses of organizations to go for help.

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