Analyze the story ”Micmac chief addresses the French.” How is this story an example of a legacy of imperialism? From whose perspective is this account written? Does the writer show ethnocentrism or Eurocentrism? In what way?

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The perspective in "Micmac chief addresses the French" is the Chief of the Micmac tribe in Canada. He is speaking to the French priest Chrestian LeClerq. This takes place sometimes in the 1600s near Quebec, Canada.

This piece is an interesting take on ethnocentrism. The person from a non-European culture...

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The perspective in "Micmac chief addresses the French" is the Chief of the Micmac tribe in Canada. He is speaking to the French priest Chrestian LeClerq. This takes place sometimes in the 1600s near Quebec, Canada.

This piece is an interesting take on ethnocentrism. The person from a non-European culture is clearly frustrated as he tries to explain to the French man why his ideas about happiness and the best way to live aren't necessarily correct. The French priest is only evaluating the Micmac's lives by his own standards; he does not look at their way of life from their perspectives. He has a Eurocentric viewpoint. He believes that lives lived according to European—specifically French—standards are the happiest and best lives.

The Micmac Chief makes it clear that he and his people don't feel the same way. They like being able to move their buildings and feel that they live just as happily in smaller houses. He explains that they are better able to hunt than the French and that the French have to come to them for help. He explains that they don't feel the need to leave their homes and brave the seas because they are happier than the French.

This is a relic of Imperialism because the French priest is part of a society that colonized Indigenous land and either convinced, coerced, or forced Indigenous populations to live in the same way the French did. The Chief's response is a clear rejection of imperialism and Eurocentrism. He makes it clear that their own culture and way of life makes them happier and healthier.

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