Analyze the following quote from The Joy Luck Club ("A Pair of Tickets") and connect it to themes of family and what it means to be Chinese, and describe how passage works as part of the chapter: "As soon as I get beyond the gate, we run towards each other, all three of us embracing, all hesitations and expectations forgotten."

The quote from "A Pair of Tickets" suggests that an individual connects to her cultural heritage through relationships with her family.

The chapter "A Pair of Tickets" focuses on Jing-mei's trip to China to meet her half-sisters after their mother's death. Jing-mei feels bonded with her cultural background as a result of meeting her sisters.

The quote serves as a resolution to the novel because it marks a sense of closure in Jing-me's and Suyuan's (her mother) relationship.

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In the final chapter of Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club , "A Pair of Tickets," Jing-mei Woo goes to China with her father, Canning, to meet her long-lost half-sisters. Jing-mei's mother Suyuan has recently passed away, so she did not live to discover that her twins had been...

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In the final chapter of Amy Tan's The Joy Luck Club, "A Pair of Tickets," Jing-mei Woo goes to China with her father, Canning, to meet her long-lost half-sisters. Jing-mei's mother Suyuan has recently passed away, so she did not live to discover that her twins had been found. Suyuan was forced to abandon the twins as babies when she fled Kweilen ahead of a Japanese invasion; she was convinced she would die and wanted to give her daughters a chance at life. Suyuan miraculously survived, though, and sought her twins for the rest of her life, to no avail. After her death, a letter arrives from the girls, and Suyuan's friends in the Joy Luck Club decide Jing-mei should go in Suyuan's place to meet her half-sisters.

Jing-mei is concerned and anxious that she will not be able to fill her mother's place. She thinks she doesn't know her mother well enough and that she doesn't feel like she will adjust well to being in China. Nevertheless, when the final chapter begins, Jing-mei already starts to feel she is "becoming Chinese." The quote in this question occurs near the end of the chapter (and end of the novel). When Jing-mei sees her sisters in the airport, they rush to embrace each other and whisper "Mama" together. Their "hesitations and expectations [are] forgotten" because, Tan suggests, they feel a natural familial bond that stems from each woman being the daughter of Suyuan. Through their relation to her, they are connected to each other. In fulfilling her mother's "long-cherished wish" of meeting the twins (instead of Suyuan being reunited with her daughters), Jing-mei connects to her roots, both familial and national/cultural. By meeting the twins, Jing-mei physically grasps her mother's history in China. This quote on the novel's second-to-last page serves as a resolution for Jing-mei's and Suyuan's fraught relationship and offers hope to the novel's other characters that they may find those connections with their mothers and with their shared cultural heritage.

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