Analyze the assertion that Hemingway's The Old Man and the Sea is about man's struggle and ambition.

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I would say that The Old Man in the Sea is much more about struggle or the struggle WITH ambition than it is about ambition only.  By saying, "Santiago struggles with ambition" makes him sound arrogant, which he is not.

Divide your paper into two parts: struggle and ambition.  Look...

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I would say that The Old Man in the Sea is much more about struggle or the struggle WITH ambition than it is about ambition only.  By saying, "Santiago struggles with ambition" makes him sound arrogant, which he is not.

Divide your paper into two parts: struggle and ambition.  Look for ideas first.  Then find quotes and facts as support.  Then, synthesize all the ideas, quotes, and facts into topic and clincher sentences.  Voila!  That's the outline of your paper.

Santiago struggles throughout the book.  He struggles with his age, his bad luck as a fisherman, his peers who taunt him, his role as a teacher of Manolin, his relationship with his daughter.  And that's all on the island.

At sea, Santiago struggles with nature: the marlin, the sharks, the ocean, and the weather.  But, he loves nature: the sea is his mother, and the fish is his brother.  Santiago hates sharks: they are the only evil in the book.

Mostly, he struggles with himself: his old hands, his arms, his strength, his dreams, his courage.

Santiago is not prideful: he has no false ambitions.  His ambitions are realistic and humble.  He wants to go far out and catch a big fish.  He wants to end his bad luck streak.  He wants to end his suffering.  He wants an honorable death for the fish.  Like a Christ-figure, he knows he is destined to suffer, and he suffers humbly, without regret.

Santiago's struggles and ambitions are mirrored by Hemingway the writer.  Hemingway is like Santiago, in that he is struggling to write the book itself (the marlin).  He is struggling against literary critics who try to tear his book apart (like sharks).  Overall, Hemingway is trying to show the sufferings of an artist through the allegory of a fisherman.

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