Analyze the following quotation from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice.''But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began...

Analyze the following quotation from Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice.

''But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes.''

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Kristen Lentz | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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As Elizabeth contemplates Bingley's growing attention toward her sister Jane, the narrator observes that she was completely unaware that she had caught the attention of Bingley's aristocratic friend, Mr. Darcy. Austen reveals that Darcy's character did not find the second eldest Ms. Bennett attractive at all upon their original meeting.  His first impression of her at the ball in Meryton was that she had few admirable qualities:

"But no sooner had he made it clear to himself and his friends that she hardly had a good feature in her face, than he began to find it was rendered uncommonly intelligent by the beautiful expression of her dark eyes" (Chapter 6).

Interestingly enough, the above quote suggests that Darcy's careful scrutiny of Miss Elizabeth Bennett actually results in his noticing her finer features, like her intelligence and lively, dark eyes.  Ironically, Darcy first pays attention to Miss Bennett in order to scorn her but actually finds himself drawn to her appearance.  Austen's clever characterization of Darcy reveals his tendency to be overly critical, but foreshadows his growing admiration of Elizabeth.

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