As seen in Frankenstein, analyze the character of Elizabeth and her connection to Victor Frankenstein. How does this connect to women and domestic relationships in the text?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Elizabeth, in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, represents the typical woman who "resides" in the private sphere (the domestic sphere). Victor shelters her from his studies, even leaving his (their) home in order to separate her from science.

Essentially, Elizabeth's job is to care for the Frankenstein family. After Caroline ...

See
This Answer Now

Start your 48-hour free trial to unlock this answer and thousands more. Enjoy eNotes ad-free and cancel anytime.

Get 48 Hours Free Access

Elizabeth, in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, represents the typical woman who "resides" in the private sphere (the domestic sphere). Victor shelters her from his studies, even leaving his (their) home in order to separate her from science.

Essentially, Elizabeth's job is to care for the Frankenstein family. After Caroline's (Victor's mother) death, it is up to Elizabeth to insure that the younger children are cared for. In fact, when she falls apart after William's and Justine's deaths, Victor's father begs Victor to come home so he can restore happiness to her.

The only women the reader comes into contact with are Elizabeth, Justine and Caroline. This said, the only settings we see them in are ones in which they are surrounded by, and devoted to, the family (even Caroline's death shows Elizabeth at her side).

Therefore, the women in the novel are the backbones of the family (meant to nurture and care for the family); they are not meant to take part in the world of the man (the world of math and science).

Approved by eNotes Editorial Team