Animal Farm Questions and Answers
by George Orwell

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Analyze "Beasts of England" (from George Orwell's Animal Farm) as a poem. What imagery and figurative language does it contain?

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In George Orwell’s allegorical novel Animal Farm, “Beasts of England” is an anthem the pig Old Major shares with the animals to rouse support for a rebellion based on Old Major’s dream for a society controlled by the animals themselves, not ruled by men. Later, Animal Farm’s leader Napoleon replaces this anthem with “Comrade Napoleon.” He bans the original anthem, claiming that “Beasts of England” is no longer needed after the rebellion has been completed. This act corresponds to Joseph Stalin’s replacing the anthem of the Soviet Union, The Internationale, with a new, more patriotic National Anthem of the Soviet Union in 1943.   

Like The Internationale, “Beasts of England” reflects principles of Marxism through its imagery and figurative language. The anthem portrays an optimistic view of a “Golden future time.” When “Beasts of England” is later replaced with “Comrade Napoleon,” this represents a loss of this hopeful view of the future. The song also...

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