ANALYSIS Beloved, thou has brought me many flowers XLIV sonnetIs the speaker happy to receive her beloved's flowers?     Beloved, thou hast brought me many flowers Plucked in the garden, all the...

ANALYSIS Beloved, thou has brought me many flowers XLIV sonnet

Is the speaker happy to receive her beloved's flowers?

 

 

Beloved, thou hast brought me many flowers

Plucked in the garden, all the summer through

And winter, and it seemed as if they grew

In this close room, nor missed the sun and showers,

So, in the like name of that love of ours,

Take back these thoughts which here unfolded too,

And which on warm and cold days I withdrew

From my heart’s ground. Indeed, those beds and bowers

Be overgrown with bitter weeds and rue,

And wait thy weeding; yet here’s eglantine,

Here’s ivy!— take them, as I used to do

Thy flowers, and keep them where they shall not pine.

Instruct thine eyes to keep their colours true,

And tell thy soul, their roots are left in mine.

Asked on by lolaaoua

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ask996's profile pic

ask996 | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

One thing to consider about this poem is that the narrator is looking back to the past. In the past, the flowers have been pleasing and emotionally fulfilling as was the love affair. The flowers, even though taken out of their natural environment and brought into a contrived setting inside were gladly embraced by the narrator. However, something has happened and the relationship has gone beyond the point where flowers can work their magic.

"And which on warm and cold days I withdrew

From my heart's ground. Indeed, those beds and bowers

Be overgrown with bitter weeds and rue,"

Withdrew is key here as it indicates the time for flowers is in the past. Hence the narrator is looking back to something. We cannot help but notice either, the reference to the weeds (possibly evil or untrue deeds done to the love) or the reference to the word rue which means to regret or be sorry for.

Clearly the narrator once loved the flowers as the represented what seemed to be real love, but that love has turned out to be nothing more than weeds.

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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The flowers can definitely be seen as a symbol of the love and devotion that the speaker's beloved offers to the speaker of the poem. Note how reference is made to the way that these flowers have been carefully tended and plucked throughout the year, and the care that the beloved has taken to organise them "as if they grew/In this close room." These details clearly show the love and devotion of the beloved, which of course the speaker is delighted to receive.

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Like her poetry, the flowers that the lover (Robert Browning) has brought her have been from the heart.  The flowers in Sonnet XLIV [44] of Sonnets from the Portugese are metaphors for the spiritual gifts with which she is now reciprocating her lover.

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

In the past, she has clearly been happy to get flowers from her beloved.  We can see this because she contrasts the times when she got flowers with the current situation in which something has gone wrong.

She essentially says "You used to bring me flowers that never died.  So let's remember those good days and fix whatever has gone wrong now..."

This, to me, shows that she liked the previous situation in which she would get flowers.

kandysandy's profile pic

kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

in the "Beloved, thou has brought me many flowers by Elizabeth Barrett Browning" how figures of speech are used in poetry and for what purpose.

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kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

how the speaker in the above sonnet speaks about her "heart's ground" and how the flowers' "roots are left in [the speaker's roots]?

kandysandy's profile pic

kandysandy | Student, Undergraduate | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

what is form of Beloved, thou has brought me many flowers by Elizabeth Barrett Browning

how can i talk about form in poetry?

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