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Hamlet, had he survived Claudius, most likely would have made a very good king.  He is certainly intelligent enough.  That fact is quite clear when he is able to outsmart Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Polonius, and Claudius.  When each attempts to spy on him, Hamlet is quickly aware and...

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Hamlet, had he survived Claudius, most likely would have made a very good king.  He is certainly intelligent enough.  That fact is quite clear when he is able to outsmart Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, Polonius, and Claudius.  When each attempts to spy on him, Hamlet is quickly aware and makes their spying backfire on them.

He also knows whom to trust.  He relies on Horatio who is not "passion's slave," to help confirm Claudius' guilt.  Horatio is one who is even tempered, loyal, and sincere.  Unlike the sycophants Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, Horatio is honestly devoted to Hamlet. By choosing Horatio as his friend and distancing himself from the king's spies, Hamlet shows that he is a quick study of a person's character, loyalty, and motivation.  Although Hamlet trusts Horatio as a friend, Hamlet thinks independently.  He is the leader in this relationship; Horatio, the loyal follower.   When Hamlet devises the plan to "catch the conscience of the king," Hamlet uses Horatio to verify Claudius' guilty looks as he watches the play.  But Hamlet himself is responsible for the plot itself.

Hamlet would also be a patron of the arts.  He is well versed in drama, able to recite whole speeches from memory.  He knows how a good actor should perform.

Hamlet is quite popular among the people.  One of Claudius' chief reasons for sending Hamlet to England to be killed is the fact that he is so well liked.  We see Hamlet's amiability when he is able to converse with such commoners as the players and the gravediggers as well as the guards at the beginning of the play.

Hamlet admires Fortinbras' actions in being able to take action against Poland.  Yet, he has doubts about the worthiness of such actions:  sending twenty thousand men to their graves over a worthless piece of land, not even large enough to bury all who will die.  We see Hamlet throughout the play admit to his own reluctance to kill.  He does not kill easily or thoughtlessly.  As a man seeking revenge, this kind of thinking might hurt him, but as a king, this type of prudence would keep him out of an unnecessary war.

Finally, from Ophelia we learn what kind of man Hamlet was before he became caught up in his quest for revenge.  She calls him the "rose of the fair state,"  the "courtier, soldier, scholar," "a noble mind."

So we see that Hamlet prefers peace to war, is knowledgeable about people and the arts, is highly intelligent, and is beloved by his countrymen.    He is better qualified than many of our world leaders.

 

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