Amir sees “a pair of kites, red with long tails."  What is so significant about this image from The Kite Runner? A) In the very first chapter, after receiving a call from a friend in...

Amir sees “a pair of kites, red with long tails."  What is so significant about this image from The Kite Runner? 

A) In the very first chapter, after receiving a call from a friend in Afghanistan, the narrator Amir goes to the park where he sees “a pair of kites, red with long tails . . . . floating side by side like a pair of eyes looking down on San Francisco” (1-2).  What is so significant about this image?

B)  If you were to look beyond Amir’s personal history, what other meanings could you attach to these “twin kites”?  What might the kites mean or symbolize in a larger context?

THANK YOU FOR ANSWERING  :P
 

Expert Answers
ladyvols1 eNotes educator| Certified Educator

In the very first chapter, after receiving a call from a friend in Afghanistan, the narrator Amir goes to the park where he sees “a pair of kites, red with long tails . . . . floating side by side like a pair of eyes looking down on San Francisco."  These two kites take Amir back to an earlier time in his life when he and Hassan were friends and partners flying kites in the streets of Kabul.  He and Hassan won the championship that year and this was also the beginning of the end of their friendship.  I believe Amir is looking at the kites and thinking those "eyes" are the "eyes" of his servant and friend Hassan.  He has just learned that Hassan has been killed and he needs to go home and take care of some things.  He doesn't want to go but it is his only way to redemption.   In today's terms, the kites could still symbolize childhood freedom.  When I look at kites in the sky they always take me back to a time of innocence and peace.  Kite flying is usually done in the spring here in the US because the winds are warm and strong.  The act of flying kites was an act of freedom.

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The Kite Runner

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