I am writing an analysis on " The Man Who Was Almost a Man," how can I keep it short and to the point without telling the whole story?I want to share with my readers three main points of why I want...

I am writing an analysis on " The Man Who Was Almost a Man," how can I keep it short and to the point without telling the whole story?

I want to share with my readers three main points of why I want to write from this story.

Asked on by beth55

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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If you will decide upon an analytical question that you wish to answer in your thesis, then you can look for passages that explicate this question and support your argument.  In this way, you eliminate other events of the plot that are not relative to your discussion and do not simply retell the story.

For instance, let us say that you read something like this allusion to Wright's story by Critic Charles Hannon in his essay, "The Man Who Was Almost a Man:  Teaching the Conflicts as a Temporary Instructor,"

Wright clearly develops the gun as a phallic symbol which will substitute for his and his father's appropriated "manhood" itself a metaphor for economic security and self-sufficiency

you might decide to discuss the gun as a symbol of manhood in the sense that it generates respect and substitutes for the subservient employment and despair of economic independence of Dave and his father as mere farmer workers for Mr. Hawkins.  Therefore, once you decide upon the thesis for your analytical essay, you have the focus that you need to direct your search in the story for supportive details.

Please see the links below to further assist you:

 

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