The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

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In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, I need to know some internal conflicts and external conflicts.

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The primary internal conflict is Huck’s development from child to adult. The novel is often considered a Bildungsroman, or coming-of-age story. Through his various exploits, Huck learns valuable lessons about who he wants to be as an individual. As the other educator response indicates, much of this has to do with Huck’s moral instincts versus societal mores. For instance, when the King sells Jim, Huck tries to pray for forgiveness for “stealing” the Widow Douglas’ property in the first place. Huck does this because he has been taught that Jim belongs to someone. Despite this, Huck has learned over the course of the text that Jim is a caring human being, and Huck decides he cannot pray for forgiveness since he doesn’t actually feel sorry for running off with Jim. This indicates Huck’s maturity.

The primary external conflict, of course, would be Huck and Jim’s journey on the Mississippi and all of the mishaps that occur. These include going aboard the wrecked...

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