I am in my first year of my Foundation Degree and there are about twenty-four books and internet sites on my reading list.Is it a must to read all or is there a choice?

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literaturenerd's profile pic

literaturenerd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

As much material as it seems to be, noted texts for a course or program are chosen for a reason. While the many texts may seem overwhelming, breaking them down into chunks will help. Many times, skimming material offers a good point-of-view so that you know what the text covers (make notes!!) so if you need to go back to the text you are both semi-familiar and know where to look.

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Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

My experience has been that (1) all those books are vastly expensive and that (2) some titles repeat from module to module or class to class and from module/class section to section. For instance, one title may show up in two modules (classes) or may show up for two sections of emphasis within a module (class). Those repeating titles are good places to start, at least. I've also found that (3) titles relate more or less to your particular specialization within the field--for example, more to narrative and less to discourse--thus a wise second line of approach is to select titles that are more focused toward your specialization. Although, conversely, (4) at some point you may want to select titles that are outside of your specialization to maximize your breadth of understanding.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You need to ask your advisor or professors about this, but since there are that many it might be a recommended list.  I suggest reading as many of them as you possibly can.  The more you read, the more background you will have and the more easily ideas will come together for you.

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Another suggestion is, if possible, to read something about the books on your list.  If there are an articles, criticisms, etc. available that you can read at least a part of, you have a "head's up" on the important points made in the works.  Then, as you reader, you will recognize more quickly what to be especially attentive to and what you can quickly scan through.  Best wishes--we all remember only too well those magnum reading lists.

bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I took a similar course in college where there was a specific number of required novels/books to be read. Additionally, dozens of independently chosen books were also required to be read. It may seem like an overwhelming task at this time, but you should probably try to tackle them all--one by one, of course.

stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

In combination with the above post, you might want to consider a speed-reading course. This can help with covering that mountain of reading more quickly and can teach you techniques to help with comprehension and retention of more of what you've read. It's overwhelming, for sure, but with guidance and application you should be able to determine the priorities for your reading.

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

This is a very astute question. Obviously the answer depends on what degree you are actually studying, but I would say as a general rule the reading lists that universities or colleges produce, especially in the first year, normally includes a lot more books than you actually need to read or refer to. Be very careful about what I am saying: clearly, you would be best to try and read them all, and this will definitely help you to learn a lot about your subject and then to do well in your grades. However, at the same time, you would benefit from maybe asking one or two of your tutuors which books they would recommend are essentials and which are not so essential. It is important that you ask them to guide you in this though, rather than just guessing yourself, as they may know that one book is particularly key, for example, whereas another one might be less important for that particular degree.

Either way, all the best for your studies and always try to keep lines of communication open with at least one tutor. It will greatly help you.

mylord123's profile pic

mylord123 | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

As much material as it seems to be, noted texts for a course or program are chosen for a reason. While the many texts may seem overwhelming, breaking them down into chunks will help. Many times, skimming material offers a good point-of-view so that you know what the text covers (make notes!!) so if you need to go back to the text you are both semi-familiar and know where to look.

Oh! thank you for your advice.

mylord123's profile pic

mylord123 | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

My experience has been that (1) all those books are vastly expensive and that (2) some titles repeat from module to module or class to class and from module/class section to section. For instance, one title may show up in two modules (classes) or may show up for two sections of emphasis within a module (class). Those repeating titles are good places to start, at least. I've also found that (3) titles relate more or less to your particular specialization within the field--for example, more to narrative and less to discourse--thus a wise second line of approach is to select titles that are more focused toward your specialization. Although, conversely, (4) at some point you may want to select titles that are outside of your specialization to maximize your breadth of understanding.

Thank you, I will try the methods.

mylord123's profile pic

mylord123 | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

You need to ask your advisor or professors about this, but since there are that many it might be a recommended list.  I suggest reading as many of them as you possibly can.  The more you read, the more background you will have and the more easily ideas will come together for you.

Thank you, I will try.

mylord123's profile pic

mylord123 | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

Another suggestion is, if possible, to read something about the books on your list.  If there are an articles, criticisms, etc. available that you can read at least a part of, you have a "head's up" on the important points made in the works.  Then, as you reader, you will recognize more quickly what to be especially attentive to and what you can quickly scan through.  Best wishes--we all remember only too well those magnum reading lists.

Oh! you are an angel, that gives me direction indeed. 

mylord123's profile pic

mylord123 | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

In combination with the above post, you might want to consider a speed-reading course. This can help with covering that mountain of reading more quickly and can teach you techniques to help with comprehension and retention of more of what you've read. It's overwhelming, for sure, but with guidance and application you should be able to determine the priorities for your reading.

Thank you, i will do my best. 

mylord123's profile pic

mylord123 | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

This is a very astute question. Obviously the answer depends on what degree you are actually studying, but I would say as a general rule the reading lists that universities or colleges produce, especially in the first year, normally includes a lot more books than you actually need to read or refer to. Be very careful about what I am saying: clearly, you would be best to try and read them all, and this will definitely help you to learn a lot about your subject and then to do well in your grades. However, at the same time, you would benefit from maybe asking one or two of your tutuors which books they would recommend are essentials and which are not so essential. It is important that you ask them to guide you in this though, rather than just guessing yourself, as they may know that one book is particularly key, for example, whereas another one might be less important for that particular degree.

Either way, all the best for your studies and always try to keep lines of communication open with at least one tutor. It will greatly help you.

Thank you, much appreciated.

mylord123's profile pic

mylord123 | (Level 2) Honors

Posted on

I took a similar course in college where there was a specific number of required novels/books to be read. Additionally, dozens of independently chosen books were also required to be read. It may seem like an overwhelming task at this time, but you should probably try to tackle them all--one by one, of course.

Oh! thanks will do my best.

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