Pride and Prejudice Questions and Answers
by Jane Austen

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What are three examples of imagery in Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice

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Many critics have noted in Pride and Prejudice an emphasis on dialogue and lack of imagery, especially in the opening chapters. However, imagery, which is the use of the five senses of sight, sound, touch, taste, and smell, does make its way into the novel.

For example, a famous instance of imagery that has been much commented on is Elizabeth's three mile walk to see Jane at Netherfield, which leaves her at arrival with a windblown look and muddy petticoats. The Bingley sisters sneer. Miss Bingley states:

I hope you saw her petticoat, six inches deep in mud, I am absolutely certain; and the gown which had been let down to hide it not doing its office.

Another example of imagery revolves around how neatly and wisely Charlotte has arranged her married household with Mr. Collins. This sense of an orderly and cheerful home is conveyed even as Elizabeth and the Lucases arrive in their carriage:

The garden sloping to the road, the house standing in it, the green pales, and the laurel hedge, everything...

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