Although Atticus didn't want his children in court, he defends Jem's right to know what happened. -to be continued (the question)-I didn't quite understand Atticus' reason for this (look at the...

Although Atticus didn't want his children in court, he defends Jem's right to know what happened. -to be continued (the question)-

I didn't quite understand Atticus' reason for this (look at the speech begining "this is their home sister"). Can anyone tell me?

THANK YOU FOLKS, THIS BOOK IS VERY INTERESTING AND I DON'T WANT TO CONTINUE IT WITH THIS GAP, ESPECIALLY IN THIS PART, WHICH WAS THE BEST ONE UNTIL NOW...

Asked on by nerazzurro

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troutmiller's profile pic

troutmiller | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator

Posted on

Jem and Scout have a right to know what his father is up against and what he is representing.  The kids see Aunt Alexandra's "missionary teas" all of the time, and those women are just a bunch of bigoted gossipers.  The kids are surrounded by racist remarks, even by their own neighbors such as Miss Stephanie and Mr. Avery with their comments on where the kids sat in the courtroom.

Atticus and his family are up against a lot of hatred.  He wants his kids to know what is right, even if it is a bit of a slap in the face.  He doesn't want them directly involved, but he wants them to question their neighbors and question their actions.  That is the only way they will truly see and learn right from wrong.  So when he says that they have a right to see for themselves, it's because he belives it is part of their education, even if it isn't pretty to watch.

elihelmy's profile pic

elihelmy | Student, Grade 9 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Atticus doesn't want them to loose their innocence and see the blacks treated in unjustice and unfairly

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