How could I go about answering the multiple choice question below?All of the following were sources of disappointment to the Europeans who arrived in Asia in the 16th and 17th Centuries except:a)...

How could I go about answering the multiple choice question below?

All of the following were sources of disappointment to the Europeans who arrived in Asia in the 16th and 17th Centuries except:
a) Asians were uninterested in European trade goods
b) Asians were uninterested in converting to Christianity
c) Asian civilization seemed materially impoverished
d) Europeans were too few in numbers to exert force on asian kingdoms
e) Asian culture was thriving and diverse

Asked on by keslyn

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

I think that if you have a textbook or some type of course syllabus from which you are operating, you might want to consult this first.  If you have been privy to lectures and discussions in class that reflect what your instructor would like you to believe about specific topics, this might be good, as well.  In my mind, I see a couple of issues in your question.  The first is the elimination of “bad answers” in the multiple choice question.  I don’t think that the Age of Exploration was met with disappointment at indigenous cultures that were diverse and thriving.  I think that European explorers found them to be a “non-issue.”  Many European explorers and the nations they represented sought to plant their flag in these new nations and whether or not cultural presence was thriving seemed to be moot.  I also don’t see Europeans as disappointed in the resistance to conversion to Christianity.  Similar to above, I don’t think that it mattered to the Europeans.  For those who believed in Christianity and in bringing it to all parts of the world, there was simply no issue as to the spreading of Christianity and the need to ensure that wherever Europeans went, the religious banner of Christianity was waved tall and proud.  I am not sure “disappointment” figures into such a calculus.  I certainly don’t think that Asian civilization’ lack of wealth and material prosperity mattered, also.  European explorers already perceived the new world to be “inferior” to a great extent, and the lack of wealth simply made it easier to overtake them.  Disappointment doesn’t seem to enter here, also.  This leaves two options.  The Europeans might have been small in numbers, but I don’t think they were disappointed in this as their introduction to the New World was facilitated with the presence of “guns, germs, and steel,” elements of Imperialism that made conquest quite easy.  This leaves the first option as meeting the criteria of “disappointment,” in my mind because the need to increase and diversify trade routes ended up becoming some of the major justification behind new world exploration.

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