Which Character do you relate to?Which character can you can relate to most? why?

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lmetcalf's profile pic

lmetcalf | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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I relate to the narrator.  He clearly knows he has a great juicy gossipy story to tell and in his effort to "save the best for last" we get some other interesting details along the way.  I think many of us succumb to being the bearers of gossip, and this narrator sure packs a punch with his final reveal of the room, the dead body and long gray hair on the pillow!

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accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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I have to agree with #3. The role that the townspeople play is one I think we can all identify with. We like to be voyeurs, looking in and gossiping on what is happening with characters around us, but we don't like to actually become involved ourselves and try to do anything to reach out to those in need.

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renelane | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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I can relate to the townspeople, as well. We, as a  society, scrutinize those in the public eye or those having celebrity status. The idea that we "know " someone, and feel free to make judgements on their actions without benefit of real inside knowledge is the basis of every tabloid and celebrity news program today.

Small towns are disappearing, but those still in existence practice the type of gossip and scrutiny that the story dealt with. It has certainly not gone out of style.

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gbeatty | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I think that, personally, I can relate to the townspeople who do not realize the loneliness of one of their own until it is too late. In our hurry-up-I-need-it-yesterday society, the potential of someone overlooking another fellow human being in need of understanding, companionship, and support is even greater than it may have been in Faulkner's day.  The story helps me take a step back every time I read it and be aware of my own disconnection with those around me, and hopefully, try to do better.

As for setting, the most prominent to me is Emily's home.  The second paragraph describes the once austere and respected home that has become anything-but:

It was a big, squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies, set on what had once been our most select street. But garages and cotton gins had encroached and obliterated even the august names of that neighborhood; only Miss Emily's house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps—an eyesore among eyesores.  

 

Jamie is of course in this description of the major setting of this story. However, I am most intrigued by the "micro-setting": the room at the end of the story. Faulkner describes it  by saying, "A thin, acrid pall as of the tomb seemed to lie everywhere upon this room decked and furnished as for a bridal: upon the valance curtains of faded rose color, upon the rose-shaded lights, upon the dressing table, upon the delicate array of crystal and the man's toilet things backed with tarnished silver, silver so tarnished that the monogram was obscured. Among them lay a collar and tie, as if they had just been removed, which, lifted, left upon the surface a pale crescent in the dust. Upon a chair hung the suit, carefully folded; beneath it the two mute shoes and the discarded socks. Then we noticed that in the second pillow was the indentation of a head. One of us lifted something from it, and leaning forward, that faint and invisible dust dry and acrid in the nostrils, we saw a long strand of iron-gray hair."

That's darn creepy, especially if you let yourself think what that hair means about what's been going on for so many years. Yikes!

Greg

gbeatty's profile pic

gbeatty | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Which Character do you relate to?

Which character can you can relate to most? why?

At the risk of scaring y'all off, I can relate to Miss Emily. I think that's one of the attractive elements of the story. I can imagine a family going bad pretty easily, and turning all of its virtues into vices. After all, they just wanted to protect her, help her make good choices, etc. Likewise, the town takes care of Emily as a form of respect, even though that means essentially helping her get away with murder. Who wouldn't want to be allowed to indulge yourself, keep all your bad habits going, and get away with everything? Okay, maybe just me, but that, combined with the darkly perverse possessive nature of her love, makes me feel like Miss Emily is a sister.

;-)

Greg

 

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Jamie Wheeler | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

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I think that, personally, I can relate to the townspeople who do not realize the loneliness of one of their own until it is too late. In our hurry-up-I-need-it-yesterday society, the potential of someone overlooking another fellow human being in need of understanding, companionship, and support is even greater than it may have been in Faulkner's day.  The story helps me take a step back every time I read it and be aware of my own disconnection with those around me, and hopefully, try to do better.

As for setting, the most prominent to me is Emily's home.  The second paragraph describes the once austere and respected home that has become anything-but:

It was a big, squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome style of the seventies, set on what had once been our most select street. But garages and cotton gins had encroached and obliterated even the august names of that neighborhood; only Miss Emily's house was left, lifting its stubborn and coquettish decay above the cotton wagons and the gasoline pumps—an eyesore among eyesores.  

 

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rsb | Student, Undergraduate | eNotes Newbie

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ii Think that the  narrator of the story is a female because women are usually the ones who are very concerned with every detail. If anyone can prove my point by getting evidence from the text?

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