After the trial, how do the children and Atticus respond to Bob Ewell's threats?

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In chapter 23, Bob Ewell spits in Atticus's face outside of the post office and proceeds to threaten and curse at him. In typical fashion, Atticus calmly reacts, wiping off his glasses and refusing to fight. Jem and Scout find the story of Bob Ewell's confrontation with Atticus...

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In chapter 23, Bob Ewell spits in Atticus's face outside of the post office and proceeds to threaten and curse at him. In typical fashion, Atticus calmly reacts, wiping off his glasses and refusing to fight. Jem and Scout find the story of Bob Ewell's confrontation with Atticus disturbing and worry that Bob will actually harm their father. Aunt Alexandra also tells her brother to not dismiss Bob Ewell's threats, and the children express their anxiety by moping around and refusing to play. Scout elaborates on the situation by saying,

But when he [Atticus] noticed us dragging around the neighborhood, not eating, taking little interest in our normal pursuits, Atticus discovered how deeply frightened we were (Lee, 222).

Atticus responds by buying Jem a football magazine and trying to reassure his children that everything will be alright. Atticus dismisses Bob Ewell's threats and believes that Bob's only response was when he spit in his face. Atticus does not fear Bob Ewell or take his threats seriously. Atticus tells Jem and Scout,

We don’t have anything to fear from Bob Ewell, he got it all out of his system that morning (Lee, 222).

Unfortunately, Atticus does not consider Bob Ewell's malevolent, immoral nature and does not think he is capable of harming his children, which is exactly what happens in chapter 28.

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Bob Ewell had a great amount of contempt toward Atticus during and after the trial. One day, Atticus left the post office in Maycomb. Bob Ewell approached Atticus with a string of threats. He spat on him and even threatened to murder him. Instead of verbally fighting back, "Atticus didn’t bat an eye, just took out his handkerchief and wiped his face and stood there and let Mr. Ewell call him names wild horses could not bring [Miss Stephanie] to repeat" (To Kill a Mockingbird, Chapter 23). Atticus told Mr. Ewell that he was too old to be fighting and he humbly walked away.

Scout and Jem did not like their father's reaction. They wished that he would have fought Bob Ewell. They knew that their father was an excellent shot. In addition to these feelings, the children were also scared. They thought Mr. Ewell was a dangerous man. They expressed their feelings to their father. He told them that he did not regret the work he did in the courtroom. Atticus responded to their concerns:

"So if spitting in my face and threatening me saved Mayella Ewell one extra beating, that’s something I’ll gladly take. He had to take it out on somebody and I’d rather it be me than that houseful of children out there."

Atticus was willing to sacrifice to better the lives of others.

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