After reading Paradise Lost, why does the creature think he is like Adam in the book (as defined in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein)?

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David Morrison eNotes educator | Certified Educator

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The Monster identifies with Milton's Adam because he, too, is utterly unique. Just as there's no one quite like Adam (not even Eve) anywhere on earth, there's no one on the face of the planet who even vaguely resembles Frankenstein's hideous creation.

There's also a sense of abandonment here which draws the creature to Adam. Adam was expelled from the Garden of Eden, along with Eve, for defying God's express command and eating of the Tree of Knowledge. Frankenstein's creature is also an outcast; the difference, however, is that he was never given a chance by his creator to enjoy any kind of paradise. He was rejected by Victor from the get-go.

Having created such a terrifying creature, Frankenstein immediately realized what horrors he'd unleashed upon the world. But the creature cannot understand this. He doesn't understand why Frankenstein would've created him in the first place only to disown him straight away. Unlike Adam, the creature has committed no sin at this point but still bears the...

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