After Montresor throws the torch into the one remaining opening in the wall, what is the only thing he hears from the other side of the wall, and why is this symbolic?

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After successfully leading Fortunato deep into his family's catacombs, Montresor shackles his unsuspecting enemy to a wall at the end of the vaults and proceeds to bury Fortunato alive by building a wall in front of his body. Growing increasingly anxious and terrified, Fortunato initially laughs before screaming at the...

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After successfully leading Fortunato deep into his family's catacombs, Montresor shackles his unsuspecting enemy to a wall at the end of the vaults and proceeds to bury Fortunato alive by building a wall in front of his body. Growing increasingly anxious and terrified, Fortunato initially laughs before screaming at the top of his lungs for Montresor to release him. After discovering that his screams are in vain, Fortunato refuses to answer Montresor, who ends up throwing his torch into the remaining opening in the wall. After throwing the torch into the opening, the only sound Montresor hears is the jingling of bells from Fortunato's cap. The jingling of bells symbolically represents Fortunato's death and is his last attempt at communication before he dies. Bells are typically rung at a person's funeral, and the sound of Fortunato's jingling bells symbolically relates to the sound of a death knell. The jingling of the bells also makes Fortunato's death more poignant and heightens the eerie atmosphere of the story.

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