After M. Gillenormand turns Marius out of his home, how does Marius continue to change as a young man on his own in Victor Hugo's Les Misérables?

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Marius, of Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables , is one of the novels more well-off characters, financially. His struggles in the novel are internal, and based on loyalties and allegiances he feels which conflict with one another. This begins in his childhood, with political arguments between his father, Georges,...

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Marius, of Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables, is one of the novels more well-off characters, financially. His struggles in the novel are internal, and based on loyalties and allegiances he feels which conflict with one another. This begins in his childhood, with political arguments between his father, Georges, and his grandfather, M. Gillenormand. As he grows up, Marius finds out that his grandfather purposefully tried to poison his mind against his father, so that he would not grow up with the same political beliefs. Feeling deeply betrayed, Marius leaves his grandfather.

Marius shows himself to be a deeply caring individual. Despite his knowledge that Eponine is writing scam letters to beg money from people, he gives her cash anyway. He falls in love with a woman, Cosette. He tries to help people in any way he can, although his lack of understanding in many situations ends up making problems worse rather than better. For instance, he tries to prevent a robbery by going to the police, but does not realize that the man to be robbed (Valjean) is attempting to hide from the police.

Marius is a kind, loving man, who is sometimes overly passionate or wrongly directs his passions. However, he usually makes choices for the well-being of others and tries his best to be compassionate. This depth of empathy, despite his upbringing, endears him to readers despite his flaws.

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In Book 5 of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables, after Marius's political views changed, leading his grandfather M. Gillenormand to dismiss him from the household, Marius becomes a very caring, independent person, able to deal with poverty.

We particularly see Marius's caring nature when he learns from the old woman he pays to clean his room that the poor family who lives in his building, the Jondrettes, will be evicted for being 20 francs behind on their rent. Marius gives the woman 25 out of 30 francs he has saved to pay for the family's rent and to give them a little extra:

"Here," he said to the old woman, "take these twenty-five francs. Pay for the poor people and give them five francs, and do not tell them it was I." (Bk. 5, Ch. 4)

He also learns to deal with poverty. Though his aunt sends him money each month, per his grandfather's instructions, Marius refuses it, preferring instead to make it on his own. On his own, he studies law and is admitted to the bar. With the help of his friend Courfeyrac, Marius gets a job in a publishing house that earns him 700 francs a year.

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