After Hamlet yells at Ophelia to go to a nunnery, what does she say about him?Act III, Scene I

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gpane | College Teacher | (Level 3) Senior Educator

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Ophelia utters a soliloquy after Hamlet leaves her in this scene, in which she laments his decline (lines 150-161). She remembers him in the past as a most noble and gracious individual, accomplished in all areas, a courtly lover, courageous, well-learned, well-spoken and a fitting heir to the throne. Now, though, he has become grim and depressed, seems to be losing his reason, and is most unkind towards her, as we have just seen. Indeed, this is generally the way that he has acted since the beginning of the play towards other people, although we the audience know that this is because he is deeply troubled inside over his father's murder by his uncle and has to think how to avenge the murder.

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