After Dr. Rank professes his love, Nora gets the light. Is this light real or artificial? What is Ibsen suggesting about truth and light in A Doll's House?  

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In act two, Dr. Rank arrives and explains to Nora that his disease has progressed and he is likely to die soon. When he begins to lament that he will be leaving the world without having left behind any grand gestures, Nora attempts to ask him for a favor, but Dr. Rank suddenly confesses his love for her. Nora is astonished and taken back by Dr. Rank's confession and immediately heads to the stove to get a light. Nora proceeds to light a lamp, which is real and not artificial. Nora's action is an attempt to lighten the room and suppress the serious mood. She is evidently uncomfortable with Dr. Rank's confession and feels uneasy about his emotions for her. Lighting the lamp indicates that Dr. Rank's feelings are unwanted.

By examining Nora's actions regarding the lamp, Ibsen is suggesting that the truth can be uncomfortable and disturbing. Dr. Rank's feelings for Nora were secret, and as soon as he discloses his hidden love for Nora, she responds by lightening the room. The light...

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