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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain
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In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, what is Huck's assessment of the Grangerfords?

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Huck is especially disappointed when he discovers the feud that the Grangerfords are involved in because he is initially so taken with the family. 

Huck is pleased by the entire family. He considers them to be gentle, sophisticated, intelligent, and generous. They are the picture of a good family in...

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Huck is especially disappointed when he discovers the feud that the Grangerfords are involved in because he is initially so taken with the family. 

Huck is pleased by the entire family. He considers them to be gentle, sophisticated, intelligent, and generous. They are the picture of a good family in his eyes. This is true of the entire family. 

However, to Huck's dismay, the Grangerfords are engaged in a long-running family feud.

Their feud with the Shepherdsons, based on a brutal, senseless code of honor, makes Huck "sick."

They shoot and are shot at on a regular basis. Just when Huck felt he had become part of the family, he realizes that he does not want to be part of a feud.

The discovery that the family has a second side stands as a contrast to the people Huck has left behind. The widow and Pap are both only one-sided. They are what they are, for good and bad, and they offer no duplicity or surprise in terms of character.

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